Picnic Point Reserve, The Entrance District Playspace Upgrade

Picnic Point Reserve, The Entrance District Playspace Upgrade

Open for feedback

We are preparing an upgrade to the current playspaces at Picnic Point Reserve to provide The Entrance with a district level playspace that captures the needs of our community.

The existing local playspace near the amenities within the reserve is no longer serviceable and will be consolidated into a single, larger play area incorporating the existing rope climbing unit to the north of the reserve. The new playspace will be designed and constructed in accordance with the Central Coast Council’s Playspace Strategy and to meet current Australian Standards.

We are asking the community to complete a short survey for us to better understand the types of users of the park as well as the equipment and infrastructure you would like to see. To provide you with some types of the infrastructure that could be included in the park, here are some example suggestions:

  • A new accessible path connecting the playspace with the existing skatepark
  • Shade structures over the play areas
  • Concrete or sandstone edging for the playspace surrounds
  • Additional garbage bin slabs

It will also have ‘Full Accessibility Play’ for a minimum of 40% of equipment. The types of equipment may include:

  • Combination swing set for junior and standard abilities
  • Separate large nest swing
  • Play units with slides aimed at 5yrs – 10yrs
  • A low level play unit with slide aimed at 0yrs – 4yrs
  • Imaginative play equipment: boat and pelican themed spring/spin toys
Image of the location of the park

 

Have your say

We recognise our community is diverse and is made up many varied and wonderful individuals from various paths of life. To acknowledge and embrace that uniqueness, we are driven to provide a playspace upgrade that is representative of this. As a result, we encourage you to give your feedback to enable us to identify our users and plan for the future.

You are invited to submit your feedback between Friday 21 June and Monday 22 July 2024 by:

 

Your attention is drawn to the provisions of the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009 which allows for possible access to certain public and personal documentation. View our privacy statement.

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Heath Boase - Project Manager, Project Management 1

FAQs

Why is Council upgrading the playspace at Picnic Point Reserve?

The existing park has reached the end of its functional life and is no longer serviceable. The new playspace will be designed and constructed in accordance with the Central Coast Council’s Playspace Strategy and to meet current Australian Standards.

What is the difference between a local playspace and a district playspace?

 Council has developed a hierarchy of playspace types guided by local and state guidelines for open space so that there is a fair distribution and a variety of destination areas for short and extended visits.

The hierarchy consists of:

1.  Regional playspaces – These are currently the largest of Council’s suite of playspaces which attract and serve people across the whole region and outside areas. They typically have the greatest capacity and variety of equipment and aim to improve inclusion, activation, and social engagement across all ages, abilities and cultural groups. Visitors are encouraged to stay for longer than two hours as they incorporate a wide array of complimentary facilities including shelters, tables, barbecues, car parking and associated activities such as half-courts, skate areas and bike paths. Examples include Saltwater Creek Park Long Jetty, Peninsula Recreation Precinct Umina, and Canton Beach Community Park for the visually impaired.

2.  District playspaces - are medium size playspaces which provide for the Social Plan District but may also serve the region with play equipment catering to multiple age groups. They are accessible by bicycle, car, bus and are co-located with other facilities such as parking, toilets, shared paths or sports facilities to maximize use and are fully inclusive. Examples are Sohier Park, Ourimbah, Empire Bay Tennis.

3.  Local playspaces - These make up 80% of our playspaces located within local parks and typically have the least play equipment. They are intended to provide for the local community and are within walking distance generally at a 500m radius.

Why am I being asked how I use the existing space?

Council is running community consultation to determine current and future users of the playspace and their preferences for the type of playspace and inclusions they would like to see in the upgrade. This will help Council design the overall playspace and select the best fit equipment for the community who will be using it.

How will my response be used to inform the design of the new playspace?

The results of the survey will help Council understand the user groups and their needs when it comes to the new playspace. This will allow council to select the most appropriate equipment and layout for the playspace to ensure the community get the best end result.

Will there be shade at this playspace?

Shade structures are included at all district playspaces in the areas of the park that are most essential – such as toddlers’ areas.

Council uses natural shade within playspace design via existing trees or the planting of mature trees.

Shade structures or tree planting are not always possible at every location due site constraint such as impacts upon surrounding environment etc. and the high incidence of vandalism and cost of maintenance of shades structures.

In line with the Cancer Council's recommendations, it is recommended to visit playspaces in the mornings and afternoons and not at the hottest time of the day (in the middle of the day) and to always wear sun-safe clothing such as long sleeves and hats.

How much will this district playspace cost?

As detailed in the Draft Operational Plan 2024-25, there is $376,000 planned to be allocated for the design of construction of this playspace.

Will there be inclusive equipment?

Yes, the principle of providing inclusive and accessible playspaces will continue in line with the NSW Government's ‘Everyone can Play’ guidelines and Central Coast Council's Disability Inclusion Action Plan to meet the needs of our diverse range of users.

Inclusive playspaces provide for all abilities, not just access. Accessible playspace design mainly addresses the movement needs of those with disabilities. Council staff undergo continued development in the area of Inclusive & Accessible playspaces and are committed to making places more inclusive for everyone.

Will the playspace be unavailable during construction and what alternative options are there?

Yes – the alternative will be the playspace to the south/west near the amenities building, which will be decommissioned post completion of the district playspace. The Entrance foreshore also has facilities for use during the construction phase.

What are the next steps and how long will the playspace take to be delivered?

As per the Draft Operational Plan 2024-25, this project is expected to be completed by the end of the financial year 2024/2025. This page will house project updates on the stages achieved throughout.

How do I have my say?

We recognise our community is diverse and is made up of individuals from various paths of life. To acknowledge and embrace that uniquity, we are driven to provide a playspace upgrade that is representative of this. As a result, we encourage you to submit your feedback to enable us to identify our users and plan for the future.

You are invited to submit your feedback between Wednesday 19 June and Tuesday 16 July 2024 by:

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