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Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk

Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk

Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk
Consultation for this project has now concluded.

In 2018 Central Coast Council invited the community to provide feedback on Phase Two of the Winney Bay Clifftop Walk that will lead from Captain Cook Lookout to Winney Bay Reserve.

The draft concept plans for stage two included:

  • a bridge across the coastal ravine that references the annual whale migration
  • a lookout that faces the rising sun on the first day after the Winter Solstice
  • multi-use spaces along the Cliff Top Walk that provide for uses such as local events, exhibitions and weddings

The community can:

  • View the works completed so far within Winney Bay Reserve via the Photo Gallery.
  • Read the Frequently Asked Questions for Phase One and Two of the project.
  • View the video of the phase two proposal below.

The feedback from the phase two consultation was presented to Council and on 19 September Council resolved that further options (to be known as A, B and C) be presented to the community for further consultation.

Community consultation for options A, B and C will be made available soon.

Where is the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk located?

The Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk is proposed to link the Captain Cook Lookout carpark with the lower part of Winney Bay Reserve located on the coast between Avoca Beach and Copacabana.  The full length of the Cliff Top Walk is approximately 850 metres with over 300 metres being accessible by wheelchair from the Captain Cook Lookout carpark.

What is being proposed for the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk?

In its current concept plan, the proposed works include construction of a look out with an easterly aspect that aligns with the rising sun on the day of the winter solstice.  A bridge across spanning to sea-cliffs has also been proposed for all ability access to this new lookout, and as a feature element of the walk.  The current concept is for a 300 metre long wheelchair accessible walkway to lead to a lookout near the top of the steps that have recently been constructed.  The pathway will be constructed to allow emergency and management vehicles to reach the lookout.  Approximately 80 metres of the pathway needs to be duplicated to provide for both wheelchair access as well as emergency and management vehicles.  

Interpretive signage and art to be developed in consultation with the local aboriginal community will make reference to the cultural significance of Winney Bay

It is also meant to further enhance and promote opportunities to watch annual whale migrations with some design elements also reflecting this. 

What materials have been selected to construct Stage two of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk?

In the current proposal, various elements of the project would be constructed from different materials.  The lookout and bridge structures will predominantly be made of steel spans with steel mesh decks.

The wheelchair accessible pathway and vehicle access trail is currently proposed to be constructed from concrete coloured to be consistent with the natural sandstone at Winney Bay Reserve.

These materials have been selected due to their durability with their expected heavy pedestrian use, and resilience in the event of a bush fire.

Materials have also been selected to enable flat accessible walking trails for users of all abilities and to minimise the potential for erosion. 

Who owns the land on which the walk is to be built?

The various land parcels that comprise Winney Bay Reserve are managed by Central Coast Council.  There are three government organisations that own the land:

1.  Central Coast Council

2.  Department of Planning and Environment (officially the Minister administering the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act).

3.  Department of Primary Industries – Crown Land (officially the Minister administering the Crown Lands Act).

The Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk is proposed to be constructed on land owned by Central Coast Council and the Department of Primary Industries – Crown Land over which Council has management responsibilities.

Why was the Winney Bay Clifftop Walk proposed? What was the original proposal for the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk?

During the planning for the first 5 Lands Walk event, the potential for walkers to be able to experience the clifftop at Winney Bay Reserve was identified as significantly adding to the experience of participants in the event.  The site constraints meant that the temporary route of the 5 Lands Walk has followed Del Monte Place to near Oceano Street and then into Winney Bay Reserve. 

In 2015 this temporary route was formalised with the construction of stairs and a path. The aspiration for the walk to follow the clifftop was later reflected in 5 Lands Coastal Walkway Masterplan prepared in 2011.  The community group that subsequently took on the responsibilities for managing the 5 Lands Walk event has supported Council’s applications for a number of funding bodies over many years to implement the 5 Lands Walk Masterplan.  The current funding from the NSW Government will enable the cliff top walk to be constructed in consultation with the wider community. 

Why was concrete used over the style identified in the masterplan (feature path steps)? Could sandstone have been used for the stairs?

The 5 Lands Coastal Walkway Masterplan 2012 considers many and varied aspects of the 5 Land Walk experience.  In addition to the sensory experiences and cultural aspects of the walk, the Masterplan incorporates a number of logistical construction issues and makes a number of recommendations to be considered in the development of various stages of the Coastal Walkway.  These include: 

  • The primary route of the 5 Lands Walk in Winney Bay Reserve is along the cliff top between the existing Captain Cook Lookout and the base of Winney Bay.  The route then continues along the existing fire trail towards Cape Three Points Road.
  • Maintenance of the ‘natural’ integrity of trails through bushland areas.  A bush trail is identified for Winney Bay and Macmasters Beach Clifftop.  The width of the trail varies to between 1 and 3 metres. 
  • Selection of materials that are durable, require minimal maintenance and survive bushfire etc.
  • Feature path/steps are to be constructed of sandstone, galvanised steel, broom-finish concrete or “no-fines” concrete.
  • Promote opportunities for tourism by investigating walking and accommodation packages.

Planning for the construction of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk has considered the recommendations and design principles of the 5 Lands Coastal Walkway Masterplan in the context of the site constraints, construction costs, the logistics of construction and importantly the experience of the users of the finished pathway.  The recommendation for a bush trail in Winney Bay was not achievable due to the steepness of the terrain, and the relative remoteness of the site in terms of construction.  There is also a need for a hard surface to minimise the impact of the anticipated number of walkers both during the 5 Lands Walk event and at other times of year.  The high use of a natural trail on remote and challenging terrain is not something that Council has the capacity and resources to maintain to the appropriate functional standard.  A preference therefore has been given to an asset that requires less ongoing maintenance and greater durability.

Broom-finish concrete that has been coloured to match the local sandstone has been used for the constructed stairs and pathway.  This material has the advantages of durability, low maintenance requirements, cost effectiveness and constructability on this challenging site.  While there is a level of disturbance associated with the construction phase, the measures taken to colour the concrete and to rehabilitate the site will see a rapid reduction in any perceived visual impact over time.  The experience of the users of the completed Cliff Top Walk is anticipated to be one of enjoyment and greater connection with the diverse values of Winney Bay Reserve. 

The use of sandstone for the construction walkways is suitable in some locations where the material is easily transported.  In the case of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk the potential for a sandstone path was considered and rejected because of the logistics and cost of construction.  A concrete substrate is still required where sandstone is used.  The concrete used on the stairs, landings and pathway has been coloured to be consistent with the local environment.

Has the pathway been designed?

A concept plan exists for the stage of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk between the top of the stairs and the Captain Cook Lookout carpark.  Council has committed to improving the level of community consultation for this stage of the project to inform the development of the final plans. 

Does the proposed path follow the same path that the current informal path follows?

For the most part the proposed pathway between Captain Cook Lookout and the proposed viewing platform follows the existing informal track.  An identified outcome of the project is to provide wheelchair accessibility to the proposed viewing platform.  In some instances the proposed pathway has to deviate from the informal track to enable the correct wheelchair accessibility grades to be achieved.  A notable part of the current concept plan that provides the correct wheelchair grade is the bridge across the chasm.  The required wheelchair grade cannot be achieved in this location in the vicinity of the cliff edge.  In addition duplication of the pathway for approximately 80 metres is required to provide an alternative route to crossing the proposed bridge and at the end of the Walk closest the Captain Cook Lookout Car Park for emergency and management vehicles. 

How many people use the current informal track?

Council does not monitor the usage of or maintain the informal track.  It is not designed to any industry standards.

With this in mind, its current presence and obvious wear, in some cases along different alignments, indicates significant current informal use.

The informal section of the track along the Winney Bay clifftop has been closed to the public due to safety concerns. For more information on the closure, please visit Council’s website.

Council does not monitor the usage of or maintain the informal track.  It is not designed to any industry standards.

With this in mind, its current presence and obvious wear, in some cases along different alignments, indicates significant current informal use.

Why does the proposed path need to be three metres wide?

The three metre width design of the path provides for emergency vehicle and management vehicle access to the site.  Access will be available to encourage community members of all abilities to be able to utilise the site.  Emergency vehicle access may be required at times therefore to serve this diverse user group.

Similarly for management and maintenance purposes, providing restricted vehicular access allows for easier transport of materials and machinery as required minimising risk of injury to workers.

How many viewing platforms will there be?

There is one proposed viewing platform that will provide a unique experience of the clifftop environment.  Along the pathway there will also be opportunities to gain views of the coastline including well known landmarks, the seascape and surrounding inland areas.

The ‘Captain Cook’ lookout already exists immediately to the south of the car park but does not have current all ability access.

A smaller accessible lookout that provides a less grand experience is also present immediately adjacent the existing car park. The pathway to the proposed new lookout will provide an opportunity to experience the cliff top environment across the community. 

Is there a bridge included in the design? Why is the bridge included when you can already go around the ravine easily?

The concept plan for the second stage of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk includes a bridge across the coastal chasm.  The bridge enables the required wheelchair accessibility grade to be achieved, while providing an experience of the cliff top environment available at few other locations in NSW.  The secondary pathway for emergency vehicles will not meet the disability accessibility grade but will be available as an alternative route for those able to negotiate the steeper grade to access the proposed viewing platform.

How was the whale theme for the bridge selected?

One of the features of Winney Bay Reserve is clear views often available of whales travelling along the coast during the annual whale migration.  The inclusion of the whale theme in the design of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk reflects the annual whale migration.

Why have the market stalls been included in the design? How many market stalls have been included in the design? What will the market stalls be used for?

At the information session at Copacabana Surf Life Saving Club held in April 2018 some members of the community queried the inclusion of market stalls in the concept plan.

The eight areas identified as ‘market stalls’ on the concept plan are proposed for a diversity of uses along the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk.  The uses may include community events such as art exhibitions, private events like weddings or commercial events like the promotion of local Central Coast produce. 

What are the expected community benefits of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk?

There are a number of community benefits of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk including:

  • Improved access across the community to the cliff top environment at Winney Bay Reserve.  There are very few opportunities for people in wheelchairs to independently access the natural environment and to enjoy extensive views of our coastline.
  • Opportunities for community events that promote experience, enjoyment and understanding of the natural environment.
  • Some locations along the Cliff Top Walk may be suitable for small weddings ceremonies and/or wedding photos that showcase the special occasion and also the environment on the Central Coast.
  • The construction of Stage 1 of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk has been constructed using local contractors; we hope to engage more local business for the construction and development of the next stage further stimulating local economy.

The attractiveness of the location to visitors to the Central Coast is anticipated to result in increased tourism spend in Copacabana and more widely in the region. 

How is the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk being funded?

Central Coast Council has been successful in receiving grant funding from both the New South Wales Government and the Commonwealth Government.  The funding from the Commonwealth Government was $875,000 for the construction of 195 metres of stairs and landings on the steepest part of the route as well as for 315 metres of pathway below the stairs.  The recently announced New South Wales Funding of $4.61 million is for the construction of the pathway between Captain Cook Lookout and the proposed lookout on the clifftop approximately 300 metres to the north.  This will then link to the top of the recently constructed stairs.  The section of pathway between the carpark and the proposed lookout is to be wheelchair accessible. 

The NSW Regional Growth – Environment and Tourism Fund aims to increase tourist visitation by investing in regional environment and tourism infrastructure particularly focussing on assets that will grow and further diversify NSW regional economies.  The grant funds received from the Commonwealth Government was through the Improving Your Local Parks and Environment Program that supported communities to revitalise, maintain and improve local parks, nature reserves, rivers, coastal areas and community facilities.  Both funding programs were competitive processes with the applications for the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk project having to demonstrate the merits of the proposal.

How will Council address vehicular access to the Captain Cook Lookout via Del Monte Place?

The carpark near Captain Cook Lookout has 15 car parking spaces.

Council is currently working on an upgrade to Del Monte Place, Copacabana. This upgrade includes a pathway, parking pads and road upgrade. 

How will Council address pedestrian access to the Captain Cook Lookout via Del Monte Place?

Council is currently working on an upgrade to Del Monte Place, Copacabana. This upgrade includes a pathway, parking pads and road upgrade. 

Will additional parking at Captain Cook Lookout be provided given the projected increase in usage?

The existing carpark at Captain Cook Lookout provides 15 car spaces.  At peak whale watching times this carpark is often full.  The anticipated numbers of visitors to the site will see the need for increased parking capacity.  Council will investigate the options for improving parking capacity within the constraints of the site.  This may include better utilisation of existing informal parking between 55 and 57 Del Monte Place as previously discussed.

What works have been undertaken at the Winney Bay site to date?

The construction of stairs and landings on the steepest part of the route through Winney Bay as well as the pathway below the stairs were completed in August 2018.  The length of this section of Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk is approximately 500 metres.  Handrails have been installed along the sides of the stairs as required by the Australian Standards. 

Previous works undertaken at Winney Bay Reserve that implement elements of the 5 Lands Walk Masterplan includes:

  • Upgrade of Captain Cook Lookout in 2012
  • Installation of signage along the entire route of the 5 Lands Walk event in 2012
  • Construction of an access pathway from near 55 Del Monte Place to the old farmhouse site at the base of Winney Bay in 2015

Why was the proposed route for the walkway selected over other options?

The 5 Lands Coastal Walkway Masterplan identified three potential routes through Winney Bay Reserve.  These were:

  • The existing route of the 5 Lands Walk event along Del Monte Drive and down to Winney Bay via the existing stairs adjacent to 55 Del Monte Place
  • The fire break behind the houses between 57-107 Del Monte Place
  • The cliff top route

The 5 Lands Coastal Walkway Masterplan identifies the cliff top route as the preferred options.  The advantages that the preferred route along the entire length of the 5 Lands Walk offers the following advantages:

  • A variety of terrains for varying levels of fitness
  • Maximises the opportunity for ocean and lagoon views and maintains a strong connection to the coastline
  • Avoids busy major roads where possible
  • Improves connectivity for existing residents
  • Takes walkers on a journey through ever changing landscapes
  • Acknowledges the unique qualities of each individual land and provides opportunities for the local community to become involved in their area and ‘make it their own’
  • Enhance community understanding about the culture and history of where they live and the relationship between the 5 Lands
  • Easily breaks down into sub circuit routes for concentrated activity.

Existing signage at Winney Bay identifies a potential danger because of unstable cliffs. How did Council ensure that the cliff face was suitable for this project?

Geotechnical investigations have been undertaken and subsequent reports have been prepared by qualified and experienced geotechnical consultants.

  1. May 2011 – Investigation was carried out to provide information on subsurface conditions to assist in the selection of suitable positions for the proposed structures within the designated lookout locations and design of foundations for the proposed lookout and boardwalk structures.  The subsequent geotechnical report made a number of recommendations including that all structures are positioned at least 3 metres from the crest of the coastal cliff.
     
  2. April 2015 – This report presented the results of a geotechnical investigation carried out by the consultants for a proposed walkway and viewing platform at the top of the coastal cliff from near the Captain Cook Lookout and Winney Bay itself (approximately 1 km north).  The report provided information on cliff regression and design parameters for the construction of the proposed viewing platforms, bridge and walkway.

    Development of the concept plans and the construction of the Winney Bay Clifftop Walkway is done within the design parameters identified in the geotechnical reports.

    These reports can be viewed at either Central Coast Council offices 8:30-5pm, Monday - Friday. These reports cannot be accessed online because of copyright restrictions. Please contact Amy Walpole on 4350 5405 to arrange a viewing time.
     
  3. April 2019 – Investigations as part of the review of the design for Stage 2 of the walk identified 130m of the informal walk to be within the recommended 6 metre setback from the sheer cliff faces. As a result the informal pathway has been closed. For more information visit Council’s website.

Is Council going to address the current weed infestation at Winney Bay? How?

Council is preparing a management plan to restore the native vegetation in Winney Bay Reserve.  The native vegetation has been invaded by weeds as a result of past land use and land management practices.  The management plan will prioritise bush regeneration activities across the reserve.  Community participation in this process will be considered through Council’s Landcare Program.  A number of members of the community that have already demonstrated an interest in the future of the reserve have already received letters from Council inviting them to lodge their interest in potential future involvement in actively volunteering on the reserve as part of Councils Landcare program.

Will Council be embarking on a bush regeneration program to rectify the clearing carried out to build the stairs? When will this happen?

Revegetation to re-establish native vegetation along the edges of the stairs and pathway currently under construction has been proceeding as each section is completed.  Similar works will occur in subsequent parts of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk. 

Provenance plant stock (i.e. locally sourced from Council’s Nursery) has been used as part of the revegetation program.

Bush regeneration works and weed control works will commence in Winney Bay Reserve along the constructed stairs during the second half of 2018.

Natural regeneration has also been evident with Council staff removing new weed growth and allowing endemic species to naturally re-establish.

What environmental assessments were carried out to develop the project? Where can I view these?

A Flora and Fauna report for the 5 Lands Walk – Macmasters Beach to Terrigal Haven was completed in 2011.  This report investigated the potential routes of the 5 Lands Walk.

Clearing of survey sight lines through the vegetation at Winney Bay Reserve was undertaken in 2014 for preparation of the concept plan and to undertake further geotechnical investigations.  The environmental assessment was completed on 31 July 2014.  It was noted in the assessment that the vegetation was comprised of bitou bush and that the vegetation would not be removed but rather slashed.

This report can be viewed at either Central Coast Council offices 8:30-5pm, Monday - Friday. This report cannot be accessed online because of copyright restrictions. Please contact Amy Walpole on 4350 5405 to arrange a viewing time.

How will the pathway in its entirety be managed and maintained?

Once constructed, the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk will be a Council asset and therefore be Council’s responsibility to manage.  Management of the Walk will be undertaken using Council’s Asset Management System which will include inspections of the structural integrity of all element of the Walk.  Maintenance of the Walk in terms of small scale repairs, litter collection and graffiti removal will be done by Council’s work teams. The materials used to construct the pathway were selected for a number of reasons including minimal maintenance requirements compared to other construction alternatives.

Will the cliff faces along the walk be fenced for public safety?

By building a formal pathway with the greatest viewing opportunities, Council will incentivise users to remain in low risk areas.  Structures will be built in accordance with industry standards and appropriate handrails and barricades included.  Encouraging and managing access along the formalised routes will best mitigate any risks.  Council will not be in a position however to absolutely restrict access to all cliff areas through new structures, fences and barriers, but will discourage access to these areas.

Will rubbish bins be included in the design?

Rubbish bins are not currently included in the concept design for the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk.  There are rubbish bins located at the Captain Cook Lookout area.  Opportunities will be provided for the community to provide feedback on particular elements of the concept plan. 

Will toilets be included in the design?

Toilets are not currently included in the concept design for the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk.  The nearest public toilets are available at the Copacabana Surf Club.  Opportunities will be provided for the community to provide feedback on particular elements of the concept plan. 

Will the rest area/picnic area identified in the 5 Lands Coastal Walkway Masterplan be delivered with this project?

There are two rest areas identified in the 5 Lands Coastal Walkway Masterplan Report – Part B – for Winney Bay Reserve.  One recommended rest area is at the Captain Cook Lookout site.  Two picnic tables exist at Captain Cook Lookout, as well as one near the lower platform adjacent to the car park.  There is no upgrade to that picnic area proposed in this project.  The second rest area in Winney Bay Reserve is recommended near the base of reserve near the old farmhouse site.  This proposed picnic area/rest area will not be developed as part of the current Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk project. 

What will happen to the $4.6 million funding if the walk does not go ahead?

If the $4.6 million allocated by the NSW Government to the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk is not spent on the project, Council’s expectation is that it will be returned to the NSW Government.  The terms of the funding agreement for the project do not allow for it to be diverted to other works. 

If approved, how long will construction of the path take? Will the site be accessible whilst the path is under construction?

It is anticipated that the construction of the section of the Cliff Top Walk for which NSW Government funding has been received will take over two and a half years to complete.  The timing will be influenced by the final design of the project adopted by Council and the associated construction implications.  Following community consultation and Council approval of the final design, the delivery date can be more accurately determined.

During the construction of the project, the cliff top will not be accessible.  Opportunities to view the works may be possible at times from the Captain Cook Lookout area.  There will however be times that this area is also not accessible. 

Who decides if the pathway for the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk goes ahead?

Council will make the ultimate decision about if and how the pathway between the Captain Cook Lookout Carpark and the recently completed stairs and landings goes ahead.  Council has committed to consulting with the community about for this stage of the project prior to the development of the final plans.  Opportunities will be provided for the community to give feedback on particular elements of the concept plan. 

How will community feedback be used in the decision?

Comments received from the community throughout the community consultation process for the second stage of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk will be formally reported to a meeting of the Central Coast Council.  Councillors will provide direction to staff on the progression of the project in the form of a Council resolution that will include consideration of community feedback.  The final design will need to be endorsed by the state government as the grant authority.

Why build a pathway?

The 5 Lands Walk event has in recent years attracted in excess of 20,000 people.  While The 5 Lands Walk event is likely to be the largest number of people on a single day using the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk there are many people who enjoy spotting whales from Captain Cook Lookout and along the clifftop at Winney Bay Reserve.

The concept plans for the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk have been prepared to meet disability standards.  The proposal is for approximately 300 metres along the clifftop to be wheelchair accessible and the construction of a wheelchair accessible viewing platform.  This will provide the opportunity across the community to experience this scenic clifftop environment and to enjoy the spectacle of the annual whale migration. 

The establishment of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk will improve access to Winney Bay Reserve.  The current access along the cliff top walk is via an informal track.  The construction of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk will provide connections to the existing trails within Winney Bay Reserve and provide more extensive walking opportunities.  Formalisation of the clifftop walk will provide a year-round experience of the scenic clifftop for locals and visitors to the Central Coast.

What community consultation occurred prior to the stage 1 Winney Bay Stairs construction commencing?

During the initial years of the 5 Lands Walk, Council took the lead in organising the event and liaising with the community.  The intention was to build capacity in the community take on the running of the event.  The interested members of the community took on this challenge and the organising group was established under the 5 Lands Walk Inc. banner.  The model of the organising committee adopted by the members of the community provides for representation from each of the five ‘lands’ through which the walk passes as well as representation from the Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Council. A number of other community groups and individuals are involved in organising and supporting the annual 5 Lands Walk.

Council has worked with the community based 5 Lands Walk Inc. in supporting the annual event and in progressing the implementation of the permanent route of the 5 Lands Walk.

Communications with the wider community about the development of the concept plan for the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk were not undertaken.  Council has committed to consult with the community about the stage of the Cliff Top Walk for which a notification of funding from the NW Government has recently been received.

How were the Winney Bay stage 1 stairs designed?

Council engaged engineering consultants to develop the concept plan for the stairs, landings and pathways.  The details for construction of the stairs were further developed in conjunction with Council, the engineering consultants and the company engaged to construct this stage of the project.

How was the width of the stairs and pathway for the Stage 1 works determined?

Stairs on pathways, such as footpaths, are usually built to a minimum width of 1.2 metres. The additional width of the stairs on the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk provides a greater margin for walkers to overtake or pass each other without having to step off the stairs.  The 2.0 metre width of the stairs and landings provides for the installation of a handrail required by Australian Standards.  The handrails extend approximately 0.3 metres from the edge of the stairs resulting in an available width of 1.7 metres.  Where the Australian Standard requires handrails on both sides of the landings the available width is reduced to approximately 1.4 metres.

The lower section of the path is 3 metres wide and provides for access to the bottom of the stairs by maintenance vehicles and emergency vehicles if required.

Have items of cultural significance (i.e. Aboriginal sites) that may exist in the area been considered?

Aboriginal & Historical Archaeological & Cultural Heritage Assessment: 5 Lands Coastal Walkway report of 2011 includes the location of the known Aboriginal sites between Bouddi National Park and Wamberal Lagoon.  There are four sites in the vicinity of Winney Bay Reserve, two within the reserve itself and one each on Macmasters Beach and Copacabana Beach.  The locations of the sites were considered and avoided in the identification of the route of the permanent clifftop walk at Winney Bay Reserve.  The development of the detailed concept plans for the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk was done to avoid the known Aboriginal sites. 

There is the potential for unknown Aboriginal sites to be unearthed at construction sites such as the Cliff Top Walk.  Council engaged local Aboriginal stakeholders in monitoring excavation works required for the stage of the Walk completed in August 2018.  The management of unknown heritage items in the construction site has included ensuring that stakeholders from the Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Council and/or the Guringai Tribal Link are present on site during excavations.  Site inspections have been undertaken with both Aboriginal organisations on a number of occasions.  Additionally inspections of the construction site have been undertaken by the Office of Environment and Heritage and a heritage consultant.  No damage to Aboriginal heritage items associated with this project has been identified.

Prior to any works being undertaken on the stage of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walkway recently funded by the NSW Government, a formal Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Assessment or equivalent will be undertaken.  This assessment process will include the involvement of Aboriginal stakeholders. 

Have the stairs been designed and constructed to meet accessibility standards?

The stairs, landing and pathway that have been completed will meet disability standards, but not wheelchair accessibly standards.  The second stage of the Winney Bay Cliff Top Walk, once constructed will provide wheelchair access across the community to the scenic clifftop environment. The proposal is for approximately 300 metres along the clifftop to be wheelchair accessible and the construction of a wheelchair accessible viewing platform.

Was the site accessible to walkers prior to the stairs and landings being built?

There has been an informal dirt track along the cliff top at Winney Bay Reserve for many years.  The dirt track has been used to access the clifftop and the lower parts of Winney Bay by those who are able to negotiate the steep and often slippery terrain. 

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Winney Bay Reserve, Copacabana
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