Public exhibition

Council controls a range of official flag poles and street banner infrastructure across the Coast. In response to community interest, Council has drafted the following documents and is now seeking community feedback:

  • Draft Flying of Flags Policy
  • Draft Street Banner Policy
  • Draft Street Banner Guidelines


Official flag poles

The draft Flying of Flags Policy establishes guidelines for the flying of official flags on Council owned or operated buildings or property.

The administration of official flag poles is guided by State and Federal Government protocol and these poles are for official and national flags to be flown, including the Australian National flag, the Aboriginal flag, the Torres Strait Islander flag, the State of New South Wales flag and the Central Coast Council official flag.

The Draft Flying of Flags Policy proposes that official flags will only be permitted to be flown on official flag poles, while complying with the State and Federal Government protocols.

Street banner infrastructure

Council also manages a range of street banner infrastructure at various town centres and key roads across the Coast, which provide local community groups with an opportunity to promote and celebrate various community events, activities or significant occasions.

The draft Street Banner Policy and Draft Street Banner Guidelines propose a uniform approach to Council’s management of banner infrastructure and provide opportunities to be widely accessible and utilised by the community.

The community benefit is in providing clarity in the use of Council’s street banner infrastructure and the aligned approach will provide a simplified way for the community to access the town centre and community banner infrastructure, with some improvements including:

  • The one booking system for all relevant infrastructure
  • Clear design and content guidelines and banner specifications
  • Council, through existing fees and charges, will manage installation and removal of all banners, removing the requirement for community groups to coordinate this component themselves

Have your say

The community’s voice is important as we develop policies. 

Throughout the development of these draft documents, Council officers engaged with a diverse range of key stakeholders including current banner infrastructure users, town centre businesses and business chambers.

We would now like to hear from the broader community before these policies are finalised and adopted.
The community is invited to: 

  • Read the draft Street Banner Policy
  • Read the draft Flying of Flags Policy
  • Read the draft Street Banner Guidelines 
  • View the Frequently Asked Questions (available below)

Submissions are to be addressed to the Chief Executive Officer, Mr David Farmer between 27 July and 23 August 2022 via: 

When providing feedback to Council your attention is drawn to the provisions of the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009 which allows for possible access to certain public and personal documentation. View our privacy statement.
 

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General FAQs

What is the purpose of these polices and guidelines?

The Flying of Flags Policy, Street Banner Policy, and Street Banner Guidelines are designed to provide clarity to local community organisations, residents, and businesses regarding Council’s approach to the management of Council assets, with alignment to best practice and protocols required for the flying of official flags.

What is the benefit to the community?

The community benefit of these policies and guidelines is increased clarity of Council’s commitment to flying the Australian Flag and use of Council’s street banner infrastructure. The aligned approach will provide a simplified and unified way for the community to access the town centre and community banner infrastructure, with some improvements including:

  • The one booking system for all relevant infrastructure
  • Clear design and content guidelines and banner specifications
  • Council, through existing fees and charges, will manage installation and removal of all banners, removing the requirement for community groups to coordinate this component themselves

Why were separate policies developed?

Two separate policies were developed which balance and distinguish the significance of flying official flags and ensuring all relevant protocols are met, while providing opportunities for our various banner infrastructure to be widely utilised and accessible to the whole community.

Who was consulted?

Throughout the development of these draft documents, Council officers engaged with a diverse range of key stakeholders including current banner infrastructure users, town centre businesses and business chambers and we’re keen to also hear from the broader community before these policies are finalised and adopted.
 

How can the community have their say?

The community’s voice is important as we develop policies. The community is invited to: 

  • Read the draft Street Banner Policy
  • Read the draft Flying of Flags Policy
  • Read the draft Street Banner Guidelines 
  • View the Frequently Asked Questions

Submissions are to be addressed to the Chief Executive Officer, Mr David Farmer between 27 July and 23 August 2022 via: 

Flying of Flags Policy FAQs

What is the draft Flying of Flags Policy?

The objective of this policy is to establish guidelines for the flying of official flags on Central Coast Council owned or operated buildings or property.

What does the draft Flying of Flags Policy propose?

The Draft Flying of Flags Policy proposes that official flags will only be permitted to be flown on official flag poles, while complying with the State and Federal Government protocols.

Where does the Flying of Flags policy apply?

The policy applies to all official flags flown across Central Coast Council owned or operated sites. The policy does not apply to Council’s leased facilities or leased open space areas or to banner poles and other infrastructure outlined in Council’s Street Banner Policy.

Why can’t Australian Flags be flown on street banners?

The Draft Flying of Flags Policy proposes that official flags will only be permitted to be flown on official flag poles, while complying with the State and Federal Government protocols.

In summary there are street banners spread across 20 different locations and the street banner infrastructure and logistics of installation and removal does not allow for official flags to be flown in compliance to relevant protocols.  

Some examples of the protocols included in the policy are that official flags may only be flown at night when illuminated, (many banner locations are not illuminated) and that official flags are not be flown if damaged, faded or dilapidated (many banner locations are highly exposed to weather events and can require complex traffic management for replacement and removal).  

Official flags will not be permitted to be flown on town centre street and community banner infrastructure, however approved banner designs that incorporate elements or depictions of a national official flag can be displayed in these locations, providing the flag component of the banner does not exceed 50% of the overall banner size.

What flags will be flown at Council’s Administration Building?

The policy proposes that The Aboriginal flag, NSW State flag, Australian flag, Torres Strait Islander flag and Central Coast Council flag will be permanently flown from the Administration Building flagpoles.

They will be placed in abovementioned order, left to right, from the view of an observer facing the Administration Building.

The Australian flag, Aboriginal flag, Central Coast Council flag and NSW State flag will also be permanently on display within Council Chambers.

They will be placed in the abovementioned order, from left to right, from the view of the observer facing them.
 

How was the draft Flying Flags Policy developed?

The Draft Flying of Flags Policy incorporates the important protocols from the Australian Flags Booklet publication of the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet and the Premiers Department of New South Wales publication ‘Flags and Emblems of NSW’

What are the State and Federal Government protocols?

Some examples of the protocols that have been included in the Policy are:

  • Flags will not be flown if damaged, faded or dilapidated. Flying of flags on official flagpoles is the correct mechanism to ensure this protocol is met Numerous street banner locations are heavily exposed to extreme weather conditions and street banners are often damaged in weather events. Numerous street banner locations are also dependant on extensive traffic management processes to remove and replace banners, and often damaged banners cannot be removed immediately after they have sustained damage.
  • The flag may only be flown at night when illuminated. Numerous current street banner locations do not have lighting installed that is sufficient to ensure this protocol is met, indeed many street banner locations have no lighting.
  • The flag should be used in a dignified manner and reproduced completely and accurately. Council’s banner infrastructure includes banners of various sizes. Council’s official flagpoles are all designed to fly flags, specifically official national flags, in the relative dimensions and manner they have been designed to be flown. Restricting the display of official flags to official flagpoles ensures the integrity, size and designs are met.

Street Banner Policy and Guidelines FAQs

What is the draft Street Banner Policy?

Council has street banner infrastructure at various town centres and key roads on the Coast, which provide local community groups with an opportunity to promote and celebrate various community events, activities or significant occasions.

What does the draft Street Banner Policy and Guidelines propose?

The draft Street Banner Policy and Draft Street Banner Guidelines propose a uniform approach to Council’s management of banner infrastructure in various locations across the Coast and provide opportunities for this infrastructure to be widely utilised and accessible to the whole community.

What are the objectives of the Street Banner Policy?

The objectives of the Street Banner Policy

  • Define the current locations of banner infrastructure available across the Central Coast 
  • Establish the purpose of street banners
  • Outline the conditions of use for the banner sites 
  • Outline the administration of the banner program and sites

What is the draft Street Banner Guidelines?

The purpose of this guide is to provide information to external organisations who wish to utilise Central Coast Council’s banner infrastructure and should be read in conjunction with Council’s Street Banner Policy. 

Who can use Council banner sites?

Council banner sites are available for temporary use by both Council and external organisations to publicise events and activities considered appropriate by Council. External organisations can apply to use the banner sites when not in use by Council.

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